Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Are Toes the New Nose?

by Marisa Amorasak

Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Are Toes the New Nose?

You often hear people advocate plastic surgery by using something along the lines of, “Put your best foot forward.” While they’re usually talking figuratively about procedures like breast augmentation, rhinoplasty, or liposuction, the tides are beginning to turn. Cosmetic surgery for feet is steadily increasing in popularity. As more plastic surgeons specialize in performing foot surgery, more options for beautifying your feet arise. Read on to learn more about the types of cosmetic foot surgery and why people are looking to get work done on their feet.

Pretty Feet

The primary reason that people opt for cosmetic surgery on their feet is quite simple: they seek improvements to the aesthetic appeal of their paws. Both toe lengthening and toe shortening are considered routine in the realm of podiatric cosmetic surgery. Many people are born with toes that don’t necessarily go from longest (the big toe) to shortest (the pinky toe). By changing the length of the toes, a plastic surgeon can create a smaller dynamic between toes for a more aesthetically pleasing foot and a gradual slope in toe length. Overall narrowing of the foot is also possible by shaving the foot’s bone— but plastic surgeons warn that invasive foot procedures may leave patients off their feet for weeks. If you’re looking to decrease the overall volume of your feet, you can also opt for foot liposuction to remove excess fat. This procedure could be beneficial for patients who have lost a great deal of weight and may still have some lingering fat or skin on their feet.

The Shoe Clause

Of course, for many women, the desire for prettier feet is directly related to their penchant for stylish shoes. Danielle Maisano of Long Island, New York, told CBS that she suffered from uneven toes and hammertoes. "I was cursed, because shoes are my thing, and I got blessed with ugly feet,” she lamented. Maisano went on to get her second toe shortened so that it would be in-line with her big toe, a common complaint from foot plastic surgery patients.

More extreme dedication to shoes is found in women who wish to have their entire pinky toe removed so that they can wear narrow and high heeled shoes more comfortably. The pinky toe is prone to rub against the inside of narrow shows, resulting in painful bunions and blisters. By removing the entire pinky toe, the foot is significantly narrowed.

Fashionable shoes can also wreak havoc on the balls of the feet. Restylane, which is usually used as a wrinkle filler, can be injected to the foot pads. More cushion on the bottom of the feet results in less pain from long hours in heels and otherwise uncomfortable shoes.

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